President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un met at the truce village of Panmunjeom for the second time on Saturday.

According to the top office's written news briefing announced on Saturday evening, the two leaders met at Tongilgak on the northern side of the truce village of Panmunjeom from 3:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. on Saturday.

Moon and Kim are said to have earnestly exchanged opinions on the implementation of the Panmunjeom Declaration and the successful hosting of the U.S.-North Korea summit.

The unexpected summit took place after U.S. President Donald Trump said the Washington-Pyongyang talks he canceled earlier in the week could still be held.

Speaking to reporters on Friday, Trump said he is still open to holding a summit with Kim on June 12th, noting that lines of communication had opened with North Korea.

He also tweeted that "very productive talks" were under way with North Korea about reinstating the summit.

On Thursday, the White House announced that Trump sent a letter to Kim in which the U.S. president cited North Korea's "tremendous anger and open hostility" in a recent statement as the reason behind the summit cancellation.
He was apparently referring to comments made by the North's Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son-hui on Thursday, who condemned U.S. Vice President Mike Pence for saying the North could end up like Libya if it fails to strike a nuclear deal with Washington and that a military option was never excluded.
In the letter, Trump said he was very much looking forward to being at the long-planned meeting but felt that at this time it is inappropriate to hold the talks.
He added that North Korea has lost a great opportunity for lasting peace and great prosperity, and it’s a truly sad moment in history. He also said “it is only dialogue that matters,” and ended the letter by saying that Kim should call him if he changed his mind.
Shortly after the letter was revealed, North Korea did express its willingness to talk with the U.S. to resolve issues any time and in any format.
Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye-gwan said the North has been preparing for the summit, and the cancellation runs against the global community's wishes for peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and across the world.
He said the North’s commitment to do everything for peace and stability remains unchanged, and it’s always willing to give time and opportunity to the U.S.
Following days of uncertainty and confusion surrounding the U.S.-North Korea summit, Moon and Kim’s latest meeting gives rise to hopes that the summit could still go ahead as planned.